Skip to Content

Art History Faculty

Andrew Chen

Andrew Chen
Assistant Professor

PhD, University of Cambridge

Email: ahc45@txstate.edu

 

Andrew Chen is Assistant Professor of Early Modern Art in the School of Art and Design. He received an AB from Harvard University in 2011 and his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2016. His first book, Flagellant Confraternities and Italian Art, 1260–1610: Ritual and Experience was published by Amsterdam University Press in 2018. A 2020–2021 CRIA Fellowship from Villa I Tatti, the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies, supported research for a second project, a book on Renaissance allegory. Other work on Romanesque sculpture, Anglo-Netherlandish painting, and late medieval manuscript illumination has appeared in the Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, The Burlington Magazine, and the Mitteilungen des Kunsthistorischen Institutes in Florenz. He has received awards and fellowships from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, the Kunsthistoriches Institut in Florenz—Max-Planck-Institut, and St. John's College, Cambridge.


Erina Duganne

Erina Duganne
Professor

PhD, The University of Texas at Austin

Email: ed17@txstate.edu

 

Erina Duganne teaches courses on modern and contemporary art, photography, and visual culture. She is also a contributor to the participatory arts and education project Borderland Collective, with whom she organized the traveling exhibition Northern Triangle. Her research and writing address three interrelated areas: artist activism and solidarity practices; documentary photography and its histories; and race and its representation. She is the lead co-author of Global Photography: A Critical History and author of The Self in Black and White: Race and Subjectivity in Postwar American Photography. Her editorial work includes the forthcoming anthology Cold War Camera; a special issue of the journal photographies; and the exhibition catalogues Art for the Future: Artists Call and Central American Solidarities and Beautiful Suffering: Photography and the Traffic in Pain. Her writings have also appeared in the journals Latin American and Latinx Visual Culture, The Art Bulletin, Photography & Culture, and English Language Notes. Her co-curated exhibition on Artists Call Against U.S. Intervention in Central America opens at the Tufts University Art Galleries in January 2022 and, in February 2022, she will co-chair the Feminist Art Project's Day of Panels at the College Art Association's annual conference on the theme of "Feminist Solidarities and Kinships." For further information about Erina Duganne's work, click here.


Shannon Faseler gives a TED Talk at Texas State, 2019

Shannon Faseler
Lecturer

MFA, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Email: SHF6@txstate.edu

 

Shannon Faseler earned a BFA from the University of Texas at Austin by following her life long passion for studying and producing art.  An MFA from the School of The Art Institute of Chicago followed shortly after. It was during graduate school, as a teaching assistant, that a love of teaching developed.  After graduation, and a move to the more temperate climate of the west coast, Faseler accepted teaching positions in both studio and art history departments at several Orange County colleges.  In addition to teaching, Faseler was appointed Gallery Director at Irvine Valley College. Recently, she has returned home to Texas and is currently establishing her studio practice while teaching at Texas State University. She continues to exhibit her personal work both locally and nationally. You can read Faseler's full CV here.


Esteban Hinojosa

Claire Hendren
Lecturer

PhD, Université Paris Nanterre

Email: C_H629@txstate.edu

 

Claire Hendren received her M.A. in Art Museum Studies from Georgetown University and her Ph.D. from Université Paris Nanterre in 2019. She has also worked as a lecturer at the Institut Catholique de Paris and as an assistant to the directors of the NEH Summer Institute Museums: Humanities in the Public Sphere at Georgetown University.


Esteban Hinojosa

Estéban Hinojosa
Lecturer

MA, The University of Texas at Austin

Email: EGH16@txstate.edu

 

Estéban Hinojosa is an alumnus of both the design and art history programs of the University of Texas at Austin. He taught Italian Art History and Culture for multiple semesters at Southwestern University in Georgetown, Texas. He has taught Ancient Art at St. Edward's University and Art appreciation at Austin Community College. As a graphic designer and publications assistant at UT's Institute of Classical Archaeology, he contributed to several books on excavations in southern Italy and the Black Sea. His lectures are peppered with his own pictures documenting the buildings, sculptures, and images of the art historical canon, and each semester he leads field trips to museums in Houston, San Antonio, Fort Worth, and Austin. He was the recipient of the 2016–2017 Part Time Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award, granted by the Faculty Senate of Texas State University.


Jeffrey Lieber
Associate Professor

PhD, University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor

Email: jdl188@txstate.edu

 

Jeffrey Lieber teaches the history of architecture and design, and more generally, the history of art and visual culture. He is best known for his book, Flintstone Modernism or the Crisis in Postwar American Culture (The MIT Press, 2018), which received critical praise from scholars across the humanities for its innovative interdisciplinary approach and for its expansion of a queer history of modernism. Highlighting iconic buildings within the contexts of advertisements, fashion magazines, Hollywood films, and TV specials, his book surveys anxieties about the fate of the Classical tradition and durability of art in the postwar era, and advances a new approach to camp aesthetics. Lieber's 2018 New York Times op-ed, “What Do We Lose When the Union Carbide Buildings Falls?” sparked debate over the meaning of mid-20th century architecture in the U.S. His wide-ranging interests in the field have been sponsored by the Delmas Foundation Grant for Independent Research in Venice to cite one example, and are reflected in his curation of provocative film series at the Harvard Film Archive, University of California, Santa Cruz, and The New School. He received his AB from Vassar College and his PhD in art history from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.


Jennifer Stob, Ph.D.

Jennifer Stob
Associate Professor

PhD, Yale University

Email: J_S515@txstate.edu

 

Jennifer Stob received her BA from Grinnell College in 2000 and her MA and joint PhD degree in 2010 from the Department of the History of Art and the Film Studies Program at Yale University. She teaches courses on contemporary art, gender and representation, experimental film and video, and global cinema. Her research focuses on the representational challenges of social space in moving images. Her essays appear in journals such as Texte zur Kunst, Film CriticismPhilosophy of Photography, and the Moving Image Review and Art Journal (MIRAJ). Anthologies to which she has contributed include The Sustainable Legacy of Agnès Varda (forthcoming 2022), On Women’s Films: Across Worlds and Generations (2019), Architectures of Revolt: The Cinematic City Circa 1968 (2018), and European Cinema after the Wall: Screening East-West Mobility (2013). Her book on the Situationist International and the social space of film is under contract with Amsterdam University Press. Her next research project examines the Austria Filmmaker’s Cooperative. She co-programs Experimental Response Cinema, an Austin-based microcinema. For more information on Stob’s projects, click here.


Gina Tarver

Gina McDaniel Tarver
Associate Professor
Art History Program Coordinator

PhD, The University of Texas at Austin

Email: GT17@txstate.edu

 

Gina McDaniel Tarver specializes in the history of modern and contemporary Latin American art and visual culture with a particular interest in the relationship between art and its institutions, issues of gender and representation, and ecopolitics. She teaches courses in modern and contemporary as well as Spanish Colonial and Pre-Columbian art history and methodologies. The research for her book, The New Iconoclasts: From Art of a New Reality to Conceptual Art in Colombia, 1961–1975 (Ediciones Universidad de los Andes, 2016), was supported by a Fulbright grant. Tarver co-edited the anthology Art Museums of Latin America: Structuring Representation (Routledge, 2018). Tarver’s peer-reviewed articles have appeared in the international journals Third Text (London), Artelogie (Paris), and The International Journal of the Inclusive Museum (United States); she has published chapters in several anthologies, and she has presented papers at various conferences and symposia in Chile, Colombia, Portugal, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In 2015, she curated En Medellín todo está muy Caro, a retrospective of the Colombian conceptual artist Antonio Caro, for the Museo de Arte Moderno de Medellín. She is the author of numerous essays and entries for exhibition catalogs and was co-editor of The New York Graphic Workshop, 1964–1970 (Blanton Museum of Art, 2009). Her current research and writing is about eco-critical art in Colombia. Tarver is the book reviews editor for the journal Latin American and Latinx Visual Culture. For more information on Tarver's projects, click here.